Posts tagged ‘World Wide Web’

Markup Language

A markup language is a way of codifying a document which, along with the text, incorporates tags or marks which contain additional information about the structure of the text or its presentation.  The most extended markup language is the HTML, World Wide Web’s base. But apart from that one, there are also others which are important to mention: GenCode, TeX, Scribe, GML, SGML, XML and XHTML. Markup languages are often muddled up with programming languages. However, the latter, has arithmetical functions. Historically, the markup was used in the industry of editorial and communication, as well as among authors, editors and printers.

Otherwise, we can find different types of markup: presentational, procedural, descriptive, referential, metamarkup and punctuational. (gehiago…)

2009/11/08 at 10:18 pm Utzi iruzkina

TIM BERNERS-LEE

 Son of prototypical computer geeks, Tim Berners-Lee was born in 1955, in the United Kingdom, concretely in the city of London. He studied at The Queen’s College. There, he was given a first-class degree in Physics.

Furthermore, it’s important to bear in mind that he is considered as the father of the web, so it’s clear that he inherited the interest that his parents had in computer technology. We can clearly see reflected this interest in the words that once said: “Anyone who has lost track of time when using a computer knows the propensity to dream, the urge to make dreams come true and the tendency to miss lunch.”

He had the necessity to give out and exchange information about his researches in a more effective way, so he developed the ideas which are part of the web. Tim, along with his team created the HTML Language (HyperText Markup Lanugage), the HTTP protocol (HyperText Transfer Protocol) and the URL (Uniform Resource Locator). (gehiago…)

2009/09/26 at 1:24 pm Utzi iruzkina


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